Brendan Cowled

Senior Consultant


ausvet people Brendan Cowled

Profile

Brendan is an experienced, hardworking and enthusiastic veterinary epidemiologist from an Australian farming background. He has extensive experience in veterinary public health management, animal health research, regulatory affairs, outbreak management and response and several technical areas (e.g. statistics, simulation modelling, spatial epidemiology and molecular epidemiology). He is an Australian registered veterinary specialist in epidemiology (‘board certified specialist’).

Brendan began his veterinary career with 6 years of clinical practice (predominantly cattle and mixed practice) in the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Australia. He then worked in research and veterinary public health at the Invasive Animals CRC (PhD student), the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (veterinary epidemiologist) and the University of Sydney (ARC post-doctoral research fellow in veterinary epidemiology). In 2012 he joined AusVet and has since consulted to many private, government and international organisations on a wide variety of topics. He enjoys his work immensely.

Brendan graduated with a bachelor of veterinary science with honours from the University of Sydney in 1997. He completed a PhD in veterinary science in 2008 and has mostly completed a masters of biostatistics. Brendan is one of only 6 fellows of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists epidemiology chapter (awarded by examination). He has served as the president, an examiner and is currently on the Chapter Examination Committee for the chapter. Brendan has published numerous peer reviewed articles in international veterinary, veterinary epidemiological and ecological journals.




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Qualifications

Member and Fellow of the ANZCVS, Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists, 2014

Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Sydney , 2008

Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours), The University of Sydney, 1997